May 2005


Some recent postings on Indymedia, in remembrance of this anniversary:

Anniversary of the ‘Battle of the Beanfield’ 1st June 1985
It’s 20 years, since the major trashing of my community, travelling on the way the make the “Peoples Free Festival of Albion” at Stonehenge. It was a regular event on the calender.

http://www.indymedia.org.uk/en/2005/05/312088.html

&

The Travellers Situation

Travellers come from many backgrounds. But similarities far outweigh differnces, in peoples expectations on what they want out of life. Recently, politics has come crashing through the door, and trampled their boots, all over the usual suspects of , travellers, asylum seekers, migrants, and the rest …….!

http://www.indymedia.org.uk/en/2005/05/312109.html

Stonehenge: Further links about it all.

Beanfield Photo Gallery 1 http://tash.gn.apc.org/gal_beanf1.htm
Beanfield Photo Gallery 2 http://tash.gn.apc.org/gal_beanf2.htm

http://tash.dns2go.com/xtra/Beanfield/index.htm

http://tash.dns2go.com/xtra/Beanfield_Exhibition/index.htm

Stonehenge: http://tash.gn.apc.org/stones1.htm
Solstice Ritual: http://tash.gn.apc.org/solst_0.htm
Beanfield: http://tash.gn.apc.org/sh_bean.htm
Injunction Papers: http://tash.gn.apc.org/stonehenge_papers.htm
My cell notes: http://tash.gn.apc.org/sh_bean-notes1.htm
The Story so far: http://tash.gn.apc.org/history.htm
Travellers: http://tash.gn.apc.org/trav1.htm
All Systems: http://tash.gn.apc.org/allsystm.htm

Jamie Doward, social affairs editor
Sunday May 29, 2005
The Observer

http://observer.guardian.co.uk/politics/story/0,6903,1494944,00.html

The government’s plans to introduce identity cards were dealt a body blow last night after it emerged the true cost of the scheme could top £18 billion, more than triple the official estimate.
The figure has been calculated by experts at the London School of Economics, who have spent months producing one of the most authoritative analyses of the scheme.

Their findings, which will be published in the next two weeks, will be seized upon by critics of the current ID card bill working its way through parliament. It is likely to spark a backbench rebellion from Labour MPs and be taken up by the Tories and Liberal Democrats, who oppose the government’s plans.

Last week the Home Office issued a report which estimated that, over the next decade, the cost of running the scheme, in conjunction with a new biometric passport system, would be £5.8bn. Because the Treasury has insisted the scheme must be self-financing, this works out at an average cost of £93 to each card holder.

But, according to the LSE’s analysis, a draft section of which has been obtained by The Observer, the true cost of implementing and running the scheme, will be between £12bn and £18bn. This could make the average cost of a card as high as £300 to every adult, unless government departments are prepared to shoulder some of the financial burden.

The LSE believes the government has grossly underestimated the cost of the technology involved in making the system work. Last week the government estimated the biometric card readers needed to scan the cards would cost £250-£750. ‘A more likely figure … would be in the range of £3,000 to £4,000 per unit,’ the report suggests.

The report also raises doubts about whether the government is right to assume a 10-year life span for each card. ‘All technical and scientific literature indicates that biometric certainty diminishes over time, and it is therefore likely that a biometric – particularly fingerprints and facial features – will have to be re-scanned at least every five years. This cost must be taken into account.’

A further problem, which the government appears not to have factored in, is ‘refuseniks’ – people who will not co-operate. ‘There is evidence that this population could create a substantial additional cost burden. The administrative costs of handling this group will be substantial,’ the report states.

The LSE also questions the strain placed on the system by individuals notifying a change in their personal circumstances, as they will be required to do so by law.

‘This requirement may result in [between] 300 million and 1.2 billion contacts with the register over 10 years,’ the report says. ‘This additional cost must be taken into account. If human management is necessary to ensure changes are verified, this facet will add between £1bn and £4 bn to the 10-year rollout of the scheme.’

The scheme, which will see some 44 million people issued with a card containing personal details including their name, date of birth and address, is considered controversial because personal details on the central database can be accessed by public sector organisations, without the individual’s consent.

But immigration and asylum minister Tony McNulty defended the plan. ‘A secure compulsory national identity card scheme will help tackle illegal immigration, organised crime, ID fraud, terrorism and will benefit all UK citizens,’ he said.

Opposition parties have expressed concern about the costs of the scheme. Critics have also pointed out that previous government IT projects have run considerably over budget. New systems for the Child Support Agency and the Passport Office were plagued with problems.

But the government has pointed out that it has ‘road-tested’ the combined ID and biometric passport scheme, one of the UK’s most ambitious IT projects, on 10,000 volunteers.

Under the scheme a microchip will hold biometric details including an iris scan, fingerprints and facial image, making it difficult to forge. But the trials revealed significant error rates, raising concerns about its efficacy.

Ministers anticipate that the system will be introduced in a phased roll-out. By 2013 it is expected that it will become compulsory to have an ID card, although holders will not have to carry them at all times. A recent poll showed that half of people questioned believed ID cards were the best weapon in combating identity theft, which is estimated to cost Britain £1.3bn a year.

A spokesman for the Home Office said it was impossible to comment on the LSE’s findings because of the confidential nature of the commercial contracts involved

But the LSE report notes: ‘The ongoing dispute over costs is due in large part to the fact that the government is either not certain exactly what the ID infrastructure will entail, or is unwilling to disclose these details.’

Pictures on my FotoBlog at:

http://tashcamuk.fotopages.com/?entry=452153

Nottingham Arboretum celebrates the May Bank Holiday with a festival embracing all things green. Live bands, monsters, fun for children and sustainable produce. Stalls, including crafts, plants, local produce, energy conservation demonstrations, wind and solar power, social struggles and human rights issues etc and plenty of other organic, eco-friendly activities.

Arboretum on Sunday 29th May, 12 noon – 6pm, FREE

Nottingham http://www.nottinghamevents.org/arboretum_festival/index.html

also there were some Scary Furry Monsters. Music was being performed, kids playing, people browsing the stalls when all of a sudden, we were confronted by a couple of monsters. They seemed to come out of nowhere!

One had horns, the other exceptionally large eyes, both were multi coloured and very, very furry. Kids ran about in all directions.

A council spokesman stated “he had never seen anything like it”. He had however heard of an outfit called Monster Massive and wondered if it was them. Asked if he had anything else to say, he said “it was very Scary”.

A spokesman for Nottinghamshire Police at the scene said “he didn’t believe a word of it.

Picture of monsters to be seen at: http://tashcamuk.fotopages.com/?entry=452049

also

Nottingham Greenweeks

‘Celebrate Sustainability’ in Greater Nottingham by participating in three weeks of special events and activities that link the global to the local.

http://www.greenweeks.org

To give an idea of why looking for some alternatives need to be urgently investigated, check out my earlier post on Indymedia at:

Nottingham Against Incineration and Landfill [NAIL] Protest against expansion
http://indymedia.org.uk/en/2005/05/311559.html

also, I have put up the leaked Draft G8 Climate Change Decisions and Sustainable Energy

http://tash_lodge.blogspot.com/2005/05/draft-g8-climate-change-decisions-and.html

Pictures on my FotoBlog at:

http://tashcamuk.fotopages.com/?entry=452049

There we were, hanging out at the Nottingham Green Festival, held this year for the first time in the Arboretum Park, Nottingham. Music was being performed, kids playing, people browsing the stalls when all of a sudden, we were confronted by a couple of monsters. They seemed to come out of nowhere!

One had horns, the other exceptionally large eyes, both were multi coloured and very, very furry. Kids ran about in all directions.

A council spokesman stated “he had never seen anything like it”. He had however heard of an outfit called Monster Massive and wondered if it was them. Asked if he had anything else to say, he said “it was very Scary”.

A spokesman for Nottinghamshire Police at the scene said “he didn’t believe a word of it. However, they had sent the force helicopter with marksmen onboard, just as a precaution you understand……. ”

For further information on Monster Massive, please take a peek at their website at:

http://www.monstermassive.co.uk

The Arboretum, Saturday 28 May, 12pm – 6pm, FREE

Pictures of the event on my FotoBlog at:
http://tashcamuk.fotopages.com/?entry=450828

Nottingham http://www.nottinghamevents.org/arboretum_festival/index.html

This was a typical, council sponsored, event.

They came, some got entertained, and then they went home. I think community festivals could be so much more. Including more community involvement. Still, what do I know about it ?

This is the council blerb about it:

———–

A great day out at Nottingham’s Arboretum Festival Weekend

Two popular Nottingham festivals have teamed up this year for a Bank Holiday showcase of entertainment, activities, stalls and a chance to learn more about people, the planet and peace.

Nottingham Arboretum Festival on Saturday, May 28 from 12 noon until 6pm features live bands, DJ’s, stalls, street artists and workshops, children’s activities, traditional English folk dance, a brass band, food stalls and lots more. Organisers are delighted to be showcasing local creative talent with Nottingham bands Trickster playing dirty funk/roots/rock, Horny Batacada playing latin/samba/funk, Neon Set playing 60’s psychedelic rock and popular local DJ’s Rick Donohue and Dave Boultbee.

The Privacy International’s notorious Big Brother Awards will be happening again from 7.15pm on Thursday 23rd June. Always a chaotic and fun night.

The venue is the Quad of the LSE. Cheap drinks as always, and this year we will be going late into the evening. DJ Rick will be playing the tunes, and we’ll have a quiet area for people who want to relax and chat. Our MC for the evening will be Chris Green, the comic mastermind behind stand-up stage characters Tina C and Ida Barr.

I’m also reliably informed that Darth Vader and a few of his friends will
be making an appearance to collect awards.

E-mail Rick at ukbba@privacy.org for information.

http://www.privacy.org/pi

I won a ‘Winston’ in the first year of the awards in 1998

http://tash.gn.apc.org/big_brother.htm

http://www.jya.com/big-bro98.htm

I rated this ladies work. I thought of her when walking in Wales or the Peak District. Looking through the viewfinder, I found myself frequently thinking, ‘what would Fay do, about this scene’. I’m sad!

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/entertainment/arts/4588595.stm

Photographer Fay Godwin, one of the UK’s most acclaimed landscape and portrait photographers, has died at 74.

Godwin was known for her images of the British countryside as well as portraits of authors such as Ted Hughes and Doris Lessing.

Born in Berlin in 1931, Godwin settled in London in her late 20s.

Paul Hill, professor of photography at De Montfort University, Leicester, and a friend, said she died in Hastings, East Sussex, after a short illness.

“Fay Godwin’s photographs were about the real world and real people, but imaginatively transformed and enhanced by a sensitive, perceptive and often ironic and critical eye,” Prof Hill said.

Godwin won a string of prestigious awards for her work after becoming interested in photography while taking photos of her children.

She was awarded an honorary fellowship of the Royal Photographic Society in 1990 and had a major retrospective at the Barbican Centre in London in 2001.

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